School Improvement Plan

School Improvement Plan

SIP st_felims numeracy

School Improvement Plan: St. Felims NS  (Sept2014-June 2017)
Strengths

  • Overall following the SSE process for numeracy in our school the staff feel that the attitude to maths our school is extremely positive. When surveyed 71% of pupils reported that they like maths, and 78% of parents reported that their child likes maths in school.84% of the parent population believe that their child is good at maths in school and 61% of the pupils surveyed believed that they were good at maths.
  • Communication with the feeder school and the consistent approach to teaching maths which has been adopted by both schools.
  • The overall attainment of pupils with regard to numeracy is at a high standard in accordance with the learning outcomes of the primary school curriculum.
  • Teachers have developed their CPD profiles in numeracy in recent years and are use a range of methodologies to promote a positive approach and can do attitude to numeracy in the school.
  • Our school environment is utilised to its full potential.
  • Good communication and collaboration between mainstream and learning support teachers. Needs are identified and decisions are made around the type of support and intervention needed.
  • At risk pupils are identified at an early stage and interventions and support are put in place to support these pupils.
  • Parents are invited in to participate in Maths for fun in 2nd classes. This is co-ordinated by our home school liaison teacher.
  • Maths rich environment.
  • In the speech and language unit the teachers work closely with a speech and language therapist to prepare the pupils for maths language they will encounter in maths class , they have particular sessions where the pupils utilise and practice this language with a particular focus on number. In these classes the focus is on oral work and the use of concrete materials There is no written work during these classes. The 2 speech and language classes (14 Pupils) are grouped according to their ability rather than age (3 groups) for these maths classes, maths recovery strategies are used to inform this teaching. Parental feedback is extremely positive in both classes.
  • Maths records and Sigma-T results are analysed and used to inform future teaching and planning. Pupils are assessed on a daily basis through teacher observation, teacher tasks and child own self-assessment.
Concerns

  • Problem solving with a particular focus on word problems and missing contradictory and surplus data.

 

 

 

 

 

Baseline Data: 

Strand % Accuracy
Number 62%
Measures 52%
Shape and space 60%
Algebra 69%
Data 59%

 

  • On analysis of the results of the % accuracy in mathematical skills:

 

Skills % Accuracy
Understanding concepts and recalling facts 66%
Performing computations and procedures 60%
Solving word problems 47%
  • 78% of parents surveyed reported that their child liked maths in school, 70% of parents also reported that they liked maths when they were in school.
  • 84% of parents reported that they felt that their child was good at maths in school due to the feedback they received from their child teachers.
  • 42% of parents reported that Problem solving was an area in maths that their child had the most difficulty with.
  • 71% of pupils reported that they like maths in school with 61% of the pupils surveyed reporting that they feel they are good at maths.
  • When asked what area of maths they liked least the largest area reported was problem solving with 27%. The staff decided to conduct a focus group to delve deeper into this evidence. A focus group was formed with 8 students from 3rd to 6th class including student of high ability and students of weaker ability. The following were the findings; the areas of problem solving that the boys liked least were word problems and missing contradictory and surplus data. The areas of problem solving that they liked best were game and practical tasks.

When asked what they did when problem solving was a bit of struggle the following were their answers  draw it, think about it, write it down, do it in your head, draw a picture and use concrete materials for solving  number facts.

  • Following a whole staff completion of a numeracy review tool staff reported that problem solving needs attention. There is general satisfaction with the teaching of problem solving as is proven with the standardised test results but there are some areas that need improvement. Teachers can increase the fun element in problem solving including real life and cross curricular approaches. There can be greater emphasis on strategies and approaches including utilising collaborative work.
Target(s):

  • To increase the whole school percentage accuracy of problem solving as per the Micra-t standardised test from 47% to 50% over the next 3 years.
Actions:     Year 1 2014-2015

  • CPD for teachers
  • PDST support
  • Problem of the week in all classes across the school.
  • Teachers will expose the pupils to a variety of problem solving strategies to cater for the various learning styles of all pupils. Allow time for pupils to articulate their thinking.
  • A consistent approach to maths language across classes.
  • Maths language displayed in all classes.
  • Maths for fun in 2nd class once a week for a term run by the HSCL teacher and parents along with the class teacher.
  • Maths games sourced and purchased to create a maths box which will be rotated between the classes each week. To develop logical and lateral thinking.
  • Continue with the maths initiative run in the Speech and language class focusing on number and oral problem solving at the child’s ability level.
  • Brain snack used in all classes including an element of ICT.
  • Participation in maths week for all pupils with a particular focus on problem solving.
  • An award for “Problem solver of the Month” presented at a whole assembly.
  • new and at risk pupils are monitored and assessed and appropriate steps are taken to ensure these pupils experience success at their level.
  • Draw up an inventory of maths resources and purchase necessary resources needed.
  • Use the Ballard and Westwood test.
  • Create a maths board in the corridor.
  • Track 2 pupils
 Year 2 2015-2016

  • CPD for teachers
  • PDST support
  • Problem of the week in all classes across the school.
  • Teachers will expose the pupils to a variety of problem solving strategies to cater for the various learning styles of all pupils. Allow time for pupils to articulate their thinking.
  • A consistent approach to maths language across classes.
  • Maths language displayed in all classes.
  • Maths for fun in 2nd class once a week for a term run by the HSCL teacher and parents along with the class teacher.
  • Continue to use the maths box rotated between the classes each week. To develop logical and lateral thinking.
  • Continue with the maths initiative run in the Speech and language class focusing on number and oral problem solving at the child’s ability level.
  • Brain snack used in all classes including an element of ICT.
  • Participation in maths week for all pupils with a particular focus on problem solving.
  • An award for “Problem solver of the Month” presented at a whole assembly.
  • new and at risk pupils are monitored and asses and appropriate steps are taken to ensure these pupils experience success at their level.
  • Create a tip sheet for parents for problem solving and maths language.
  • Augment our resources for the problem solving boxes.
  • Teachers will have a pack available to pupils which will enable them to articulate their thinking around problem solving.
 Year 3 2016-2017

  • CPD for teachers
  • PDST support
  • Problem of the week in all classes across the school.
  • Teachers will expose the pupils to a variety of problem solving strategies to cater for the various learning styles of all pupils. Allow time for pupils to articulate their thinking.
  • A consistent approach to maths language across classes.
  • Maths language displayed in all classes.
  • Maths for fun in 2nd class once a week for a term run by the HSCL teacher and parents along with the class teacher.
  • Continue to use the maths box rotated between the classes each week. To develop logical and lateral thinking.
  • Continue with the maths initiative run in the Speech and language class focusing on number and oral problem solving at the child’s ability level.
  • Brain snack used in all classes including an element of ICT.
  • Participation in maths week for all pupils with a particular focus on problem solving.
  • An award for “Problem solver of the Month” presented at a whole assembly.
  • new and at risk pupils are monitored and asses and appropriate steps are taken to ensure these pupils experience success at their level.
  • Create a tip sheet for parents for problem solving and maths language.
  • Augment our resources for the problem solving boxes.
  • Teachers will have a pack available to pupils which will enable them to articulate their thinking around problem solving.
  • Create a maths library of games . one day a week pupils will have no written home work instead they will bring one of these games home and play them at parents.
  • Purchase some resource for further development of lateral and logical thinking
Monitoring/ Evaluation:When

Monthly

Termly

 

3 times annually

 

Yearly

 Who

Whole staff

Class teachers, learning support

 

Class teachers

 

class teachers

 How?

Informally/ Croke Park hour.

Informal observation, teacher questioning and teacher designed tasks.

Ballard and Westwood

 

Sigma-t standardised test.

    Success Criteria

  • Evidence from the Ballard and Westwood test and Sigma-T standardised tests.
  • Maths board in the corridor and reward system at assembly.
  • Teachers reporting on improvement in children ability to orally discuss and retell their problem solving.
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